Month: July 2017

Mobile has mo’ in common with Mo Brooks

Conservatives in Mobile and Baldwin counties should seriously consider voting for Mo Brooks in the upcoming Republican Senate primary because they have more in common with the Huntsville congressman than they might think. Sure, Brooks may represent a faraway district known more for moon landings than MoonPies, but when it comes to what Mobile needs most – jobs, jobs, and more jobs – he is the only candidate with a track record of success. Huntsville is bursting at the seams. Good companies offering great jobs have flocked to the area for years, and more seem to announce their plans to expand or move there every month. National magazines and websites often rank the city as a top location for everything from job growth to affordability. It’s a modern day boomtown. So what’s happening in H’ville? Nothing magical. It is, more or less, just like every other medium-sized city in the South … except for one important distinguishing factor that makes Huntsville attractive to companies. In a word, it’s leadership, and Brooks has been a leader here since the boom went bang. Hey folks, I’m from Mobile, too, and my roots run deep there. My family helped settled the area before statehood; I grew up in a middle class neighborhood and attended school, even college, all off Old Shell Road. I only left, somewhat reluctantly, in search of better opportunities, but when I die that’s where I’ll be buried. It’s not just my hometown; it’ll always be my home. Point is,…

Superintendent Sentance deserves better from our state board of education

Some say don't change horses in midstream. Others say if you find yourself in a hole, stop digging.  One of those idioms will likely describe the conclusion reached by our state board of education during today's controversial meeting to evaluate superintendent Michael Sentance. The only question is, which will it be? Mere months after accepting his own form of mission impossible - trying to improve Alabama's government-run schools - our superintendent found himself on the hot seat. And it hasn't gotten any cooler. Sentance sat through a difficult board meeting last March and received a scolding from members for not keeping them informed about changes he was considering. He had created committees to consider restructuring math, science, and reading standards and instruction, taken over Montgomery's government-run schools, and proposed restructuring the state's reading, math, and science initiatives. Rumors of proposed changes began leaking from the education department and constituents began asking board members questions they couldn't answer. "You don't let your board members be blindsided," said board member Jeff Newman, R-Millport, and Stephanie Bell, R-Montgomery, agreed. "There is an extreme lack of communication," she said. And it went on and on. Sentance promised to do better and control the leaks. In fact, he's managed a few major victories. After the board unanimously voted to ditch the ACT Aspire test, it was Sentance who personally convinced bureaucrats at the U.S. Department of Education to grant a waiver for Alabama to use a temporary test while long-term solutions were sought. Without his…

It’s our tradition to value tradition

A survey released last month by the Pew Research Center showed that a steadily increasing majority of Americans now support same-sex marriage. What a difference a few years makes. When the firm began asking the question in 2001, our nation was against legalizing same-sex marriage by a margin of 57% to 35%. As of this summer, 62% support same-sex marriage while only 32% oppose it, and Gallup reports nearly identical numbers. The trend is visible no matter how one segments the population – by age, gender, race, income, political philosophy, and faith – and it shows no signs of reversing or even stalling. In terms of how we’ve long defined the most significant relationship in society – a marriage – it’s nothing short of an abrupt and wholesale revolution. It took millennia to firmly establish the tradition as being solely between one man and one woman, but it was fundamentally transformed in less than the lifespan of a chimpanzee. That’s why conservatives, regardless of their personal preferences, are justified, perhaps even required, to greet this radical departure with skepticism because of our principle of tradition. This principle basically states that our starting position is to defer to that which has been established by immemorial usage. That doesn’t necessarily mean anyone who holds such a view is close-minded or completely resistant to any change. It simply means that conservatives believe that our ancestors slowly created many of our long-standing traditions, like traditional marriage, because they were eventually found to be the…

Are you still proud to be an American?

When we turn on the radio during this year's Fourth of July fireworks show, we'll all be reminded that Lee Greenwood is still "Proud to be an American." But are you? That would have been a silly question a few generations ago, back when people still recognized how rare our opportunities really are and still knew the true cost of our freedoms. Many had lived without such things, so they were extremely proud to live in a nation where they were abundant. As Bob Dylan sang, "... the times they are a-changin'." A recent poll released by FOX News showed that only a tad more than half of all Americans -- an embarrassing 51-percent -- said they were proud of our country. A whopping 42-percent responded in the negative, actually saying they were not, with the remaining 7-percent not really knowing how they feel. On the one hand, that's sad. There's so much we have to be proud of and thankful for. On the other, that's pretty darn enraging. What is the matter with these people? Have we become a nation of ungrateful, spoiled brats? I guess so, but before you shrug of these abysmal numbers to the "Blame America First" crowd, know that the poll also found that only 61-percent of Republicans said they were proud of America. This, from a party that wraps itself in the flag. Something is amiss. Sure, the poll also showed that only 39-percent of Democrats are proud of our country, but that makes…