Month: September 2017

Three Lessons Republicans Must Learn From That Messy Alabama Primary

Some say Judge Roy Moore’s victory over Senator Luther Strange last Tuesday was a loss for the president: “Alabama defeat leaves Trump weakened, isolated amid mounting challenges,” read a headline in the Washington Post. Others say it was a defeat for the Senate majority leader: “Judge Roy Moore wins Alabama Senate primary, dealing a huge blow to Mitch McConnell,” declared the liberal news site Vox. And a few even say it was all about the chairman of Breitbart News: “Steve Bannon just defeated Trump,” wrote liberal columnist E.J. Dionne Jr. But this wasn’t about Trump or McConnell or Bannon, and it wasn’t even really about Moore or Strange. It was about Alabama. More precisely, it was about how Republicans in Alabama choose candidates to stand against Democrats in the general election, and then against liberalism once in office. But if we allow a proxy war between Trump and McConnell and Bannon and whoever else to distract us, then we’ll fail to learn some valuable lessons that tumbled out of this messy but instructive race. It’d be foolish to repeat these mistakes in another Republican primary, but it could be catastrophic to do so during a general election. So let’s remind ourselves of three big ones: Lesson 1: Never disrespect the voters. Like many Republicans in Alabama, I had a somewhat open mind at the beginning of the primary. And there was plenty to like. If you like former Senator Jeff Sessions, then you’d probably love Congressman Mo Brooks. He’d carry…

How a silver bracelet changed my life

A silver bracelet changed my life. It was the fall of 1993. I had just turned 19-years old and was a freshly minted airman undergoing advanced training at Sheppard Air Force Base in Wichita Falls, Texas. My days were monotonous so I joined the honor guard to break the routine (that, and I got out of afternoon P.T. twice a week). I didn’t expect much, but the first day of practice is now stamped in my memory as a life-changer. Not for what I learned about swords or rifles or precision marching, but for what I learned about life itself. I was assigned to a new team when I first showed up for practice. As we formed up, one of the more experienced airmen began teaching us new guys the basics of the saber – how to march with the sword, flip it around and salute with the blade drawn. My memory of that airman is surprisingly clear, seeing how I only spent maybe 30-minutes with him nearly a quarter-century ago. He was about 20-years old, blonde with a fair complexion, slim, polite and confident. He was deft with the saber and, despite the short training session, passed along a good bit of skill. The sergeant in charge of the teams hollered “Listen up! Take 15-minutes then meet me on the parade field ready to drill.” Most of us made our way over to the break area and I remember lighting up a Marlboro Red and leaning against the table…

The day they said my child had a chromosomal abnormality

My last post about how it’s monstrous to abort unborn babies because they have Down syndrome elicited some equally monstrous yet sadly predictable responses from the far left. “They’re too much of a burden,” sums them up. That only strengthens my analogy to Nazi eugenics, I told them, but one reader asked a question that I feel compelled to answer publicly. “Do you know how it feels,” she asked, “to be told your baby would be born severely disabled?” Yes, I do, and that’s partially why it grieves me that so many parents are choosing abortion after those prenatal screenings. It was mid-August of 2006 and my wife and I were expecting our second child. I was sitting at my desk in the Pentagon when the phone rang. It was my wife, and she was sobbing uncontrollably. “What happened?” I asked, standing so abruptly that I sent my office chair flying backward and crashing into the wall. The telephone receiver shook in my hands as I imagined the worst. “Something’s wrong with the baby,” she managed to say between tears. “The doctor’s office called. Something’s wrong with the baby.” I rushed home and found my wife lying on the bed, still crying. I sat beside her and took her tightly into my arms until she could explain. Her doctor had called and said a routine screening indicated that our child had Trisomy 18, which is a chromosomal abnormality like Down syndrome only much worse and usually fatal. After many tears…

The long-awaited “cure” for Down syndrome has finally arrived

It seems that Iceland has discovered a cure for chromosomal abnormalities. Or at least what would have passed for a cure in Nazi Germany. “Iceland is on pace to virtually eliminate Down syndrome through abortion,” tweeted CBS News last month while promoting a story the network was about to air. That odd choice of words fueled an immediate tweetstorm from the prolife community and families of those with the syndrome. Thousands responded, but it was actress Patricia Heaton who put it best. “Iceland isn’t actually eliminating Down syndrome,” she wrote. “They’re just killing everybody that has it. Big difference.” A big difference, indeed. My three-inch thick American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language may be a few decades old but that protects it from all the silly euphemisms that have arisen in our politically-correct culture. I checked, and it says that the “study of hereditary improvement, especially of human improvement by genetic control” is something called “eugenics.” Eugenics, as in the Action T4 mass murder program, and CBS News promotes the story like Iceland has discovered some new method of curing sick babies. Nope. They’re just getting better at an old-fashioned way of killing them. That’s all. “Since prenatal screening tests were introduced in Iceland in the early 2000s, the vast majority of women – close to 100-percent – who received a positive test for Down syndrome terminated their pregnancy,” the CBS News report noted. “While the tests are optional, the government states that all expectant mothers must be informed…