Category: Culture

The day they said my child had a chromosomal abnormality

My last post about how it’s monstrous to abort unborn babies because they have Down syndrome elicited some equally monstrous yet sadly predictable responses from the far left. “They’re too much of a burden,” sums them up. That only strengthens my analogy to Nazi eugenics, I told them, but one reader asked a question that I feel compelled to answer publicly. “Do you know how it feels,” she asked, “to be told your baby would be born severely disabled?” Yes, I do, and that’s partially why it grieves me that so many parents are choosing abortion after those prenatal screenings. It was mid-August of 2006 and my wife and I were expecting our second child. I was sitting at my desk in the Pentagon when the phone rang. It was my wife, and she was sobbing uncontrollably. “What happened?” I asked, standing so abruptly that I sent my office chair flying backward and crashing into the wall. The telephone receiver shook in my hands as I imagined the worst. “Something’s wrong with the baby,” she managed to say between tears. “The doctor’s office called. Something’s wrong with the baby.” I rushed home and found my wife lying on the bed, still crying. I sat beside her and took her tightly into my arms until she could explain. Her doctor had called and said a routine screening indicated that our child had Trisomy 18, which is a chromosomal abnormality like Down syndrome only much worse and usually fatal. After many tears…

The long-awaited “cure” for Down syndrome has finally arrived

It seems that Iceland has discovered a cure for chromosomal abnormalities. Or at least what would have passed for a cure in Nazi Germany. “Iceland is on pace to virtually eliminate Down syndrome through abortion,” tweeted CBS News last month while promoting a story the network was about to air. That odd choice of words fueled an immediate tweetstorm from the prolife community and families of those with the syndrome. Thousands responded, but it was actress Patricia Heaton who put it best. “Iceland isn’t actually eliminating Down syndrome,” she wrote. “They’re just killing everybody that has it. Big difference.” A big difference, indeed. My three-inch thick American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language may be a few decades old but that protects it from all the silly euphemisms that have arisen in our politically-correct culture. I checked, and it says that the “study of hereditary improvement, especially of human improvement by genetic control” is something called “eugenics.” Eugenics, as in the Action T4 mass murder program, and CBS News promotes the story like Iceland has discovered some new method of curing sick babies. Nope. They’re just getting better at an old-fashioned way of killing them. That’s all. “Since prenatal screening tests were introduced in Iceland in the early 2000s, the vast majority of women – close to 100-percent – who received a positive test for Down syndrome terminated their pregnancy,” the CBS News report noted. “While the tests are optional, the government states that all expectant mothers must be informed…

America, how should we remember this soldier?

Elijah Morrison had a small farm in the shadow of the Blue Ridge Mountains, outside the rural community of Talking Rock, Georgia. It was beautiful country. Good soil, clean water, and the woods were heavy with game. It was the type of place a man would fight to stay, not leave to fight. But by the winter of 1862 the war had drained most of the young men from the county and calls for more volunteers came daily. “To Arms! To Arms!” read the recruiting posters. “Rally Young Men! To War!” Elijah was hesitant. At 36, he was older than most who initially joined, and he was bound to the land, a poor farmer who worked it alone, and food was becoming scarce. He would have to leave his wife, Esther, to run the farm alone with their three children – 12-year old Julia, 11-year old Emma, and his son, 7-year old Montgomery. Politicians said the war would be over by then, anyway. But it was now nearing its 20th month and the newspapers told of horrific battles in places like Shiloh, Manassas, and Sharpsburg. The death toll kept rising and the call to arms kept sounding. Many of his friends had already answered, and the Union Army kept marching closer, ever closer, to Georgia. So finally, on his 37th birthday – December 1, 1862 – Elijah bid a sad farewell to Esther and his children and walked off to enlist in the 36th Regiment, Georgia Infantry. If it’s any…

We should still honor Civil War soldiers, both blue and gray

My father was a member of the Sons of Confederate Veterans and my mother was president of her local chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy. General Robert E. Lee’s portrait hung over our fireplace mantle, and the Confederate battle flag could be found throughout our little house – on hats, coffee cups, plates, clocks, and bedspreads, even chessboards. And of course, our dogs were named Rebel and Dixie. But my children and I will never join those organizations, the battle flag is nowhere to be found in my home, and our pets are named after a dragon (Smaug) and coffee drinks (Mocha and Frappé). Times have changed. But what hasn’t changed is the respect I have for my ancestors who left their farms in Baldwin County to fight, and die, in the war, even though I don’t respect “The Lost Cause” for which they fought nor many of the politicians and generals who led them. Some may not recognize the distinction between the “cause” and the soldier, between the politician and the soldier, or even between the general and the soldier, but there does exist a difference. The reason the Southern states rebelled was to maintain the institution of slavery. It was an unjust cause, it’s rightfully condemned, and it doesn’t deserve to be venerated in our public spaces. But the main reason many Southern men volunteered to fight was their sense of duty, however misplaced. Then, as now, and in every culture, there’s something within young men that compels them to answer…

It’s our tradition to value tradition

A survey released last month by the Pew Research Center showed that a steadily increasing majority of Americans now support same-sex marriage. What a difference a few years makes. When the firm began asking the question in 2001, our nation was against legalizing same-sex marriage by a margin of 57% to 35%. As of this summer, 62% support same-sex marriage while only 32% oppose it, and Gallup reports nearly identical numbers. The trend is visible no matter how one segments the population – by age, gender, race, income, political philosophy, and faith – and it shows no signs of reversing or even stalling. In terms of how we’ve long defined the most significant relationship in society – a marriage – it’s nothing short of an abrupt and wholesale revolution. It took millennia to firmly establish the tradition as being solely between one man and one woman, but it was fundamentally transformed in less than the lifespan of a chimpanzee. That’s why conservatives, regardless of their personal preferences, are justified, perhaps even required, to greet this radical departure with skepticism because of our principle of tradition. This principle basically states that our starting position is to defer to that which has been established by immemorial usage. That doesn’t necessarily mean anyone who holds such a view is close-minded or completely resistant to any change. It simply means that conservatives believe that our ancestors slowly created many of our long-standing traditions, like traditional marriage, because they were eventually found to be the…

Are you still proud to be an American?

When we turn on the radio during this year's Fourth of July fireworks show, we'll all be reminded that Lee Greenwood is still "Proud to be an American." But are you? That would have been a silly question a few generations ago, back when people still recognized how rare our opportunities really are and still knew the true cost of our freedoms. Many had lived without such things, so they were extremely proud to live in a nation where they were abundant. As Bob Dylan sang, "... the times they are a-changin'." A recent poll released by FOX News showed that only a tad more than half of all Americans -- an embarrassing 51-percent -- said they were proud of our country. A whopping 42-percent responded in the negative, actually saying they were not, with the remaining 7-percent not really knowing how they feel. On the one hand, that's sad. There's so much we have to be proud of and thankful for. On the other, that's pretty darn enraging. What is the matter with these people? Have we become a nation of ungrateful, spoiled brats? I guess so, but before you shrug of these abysmal numbers to the "Blame America First" crowd, know that the poll also found that only 61-percent of Republicans said they were proud of America. This, from a party that wraps itself in the flag. Something is amiss. Sure, the poll also showed that only 39-percent of Democrats are proud of our country, but that makes…

We must confront the evolving and growing threat of pornography

It seems every week brings fresh reports about the new and very harmful effects pornography is now having on our society, particularly on our young. “Study sees link between porn, sexual dysfunction in men,” reads a headline from the Chicago Tribune. “The emergence of the “pornosexual”: internet users who shun sex with real people,” is the title of a recent article in The Telegraph. “Kansas House declares pornography a public health crisis,” reported the Topeka Capital Journal. These and similar reports often reach the same conclusion: today’s ease of access to free online pornography and the frequency of its use have combined to cause unprecedented changes to the parts of our brains that control the ability to form healthy relationships and have satisfying sexual experiences. The reports also tend to carry a rather dire warning: while some adults are certainly being impacted, many children are having their sexual interests and abilities irreversibly altered by consuming large doses of pornography during their developmental years. Doctors have been reporting alarmingly high rates of healthy young men being unable to have normal sexual activity with their partners, and some see a correlation between the condition and a long-term and frequent use of pornography. Some now believe that viewing large amounts of pornography during their adolescence – right when a person’s brain is growing and forming its neural pathways – has actually rewired the way they think about, and can act upon, their sexual desires. The articles indicate that younger men aren’t simply reporting…

Are conservatives winning the culture war?

It’s been a quarter century since Pat Buchanan took the stage at the 1992 Republican National Convention and introduced the phrase “culture war” into our nation’s lexicon. “There is a religious war going on in our country for the soul of America,” Buchanan said. “It is a cultural war, as critical to the kind of nation we will one day be as was the Cold War itself.” The fire and brimstone tone of his speech embarrassed moderates within the party, but the truth of the matter is that Buchanan was, and remains, correct. We are certainly in a cultural war. One side faithfully adheres to the traditions that have made our nation great while the other wants to trade them for unproven fads. We’ve long told ourselves that, like the Roman Empire before us, the only way America could be defeated is from within. What else is “within” a country if not its culture, and what within a culture is more telling than what it considers virtuous? We’ve known this from our Founding. “While the people are virtuous they cannot be subdued,” wrote Sam Adams in a 1779 letter to a fellow Massachusetts patriot. “But when once they lose their virtue they will be ready to surrender their liberties to the first external or internal invader.” So if we are in a cultural war for the virtue of our nation – and indeed we are – we must, like every good battlefield commander, take a brutally honest assessment of the…

We must protect speech, even ‘hate’ speech

Alabamians should be quite proud of the substantial progress that our state has made on the issue of racism. Last Tuesday night, a speech was given at Auburn University by a man who proclaims to be "dedicated to the heritage, identity, and future of people of European descent in the United States." His speech was called ignorant, extremist, and racist, and the tension it created caused the talk to be covered by national and even international media. It was cancelled by school administrators, a federal court weighed-in, an order was issued, and dueling demonstrations ensued. There were even a couple of nasty fist fights. But if that same speech would have been delivered six decades ago, at the same location, it would have been called ... Tuesday night. Nobody would have noticed. Campus life would have moved along as if nothing controversial was being spoken inside that nondescript university building, and not a single reporter would have wasted their time covering something so commonplace as a little-known racist saying racists things somewhere in Alabama. That's undeniable progress, so good on you, Heart of Dixie. On the other hand, the fact that so many people did notice - and moreover, that they responded so poorly - does present the millennial generation with an entirely different yet equally insidious threat to their freedoms: censorship. Here's how it went down: earlier this month Auburn University announced that it was cancelling a speech scheduled to be delivered on campus by Richard Spencer, the aforementioned…

Should conservatives care when politicians commit adultery?

One glaring distinction between conservatism and liberalism is that conservatives believe there is usually a clear right and wrong on most social questions, or at the very least a more virtuous way to behave in difficult situations. Whether at first glance or after careful study, we find very few actual gray areas in our mostly black and white world. In fact, Russell Kirk considered this understanding to be our movement's initial principle. "First, the conservative believes that there exists an enduring moral order," Kirk wrote in his famous summation of conservatism. "That order is made for man, and man made for it; human nature is a constant, and moral truths are permanent." Loyalty. Fidelity. Honesty. These are but a few virtues found within this enduring moral order. While some may cast them aside as relics of a puritan past, we are governed by them no less than our ancestors were. For who wants to be betrayed, cheated upon, or lied to? As Kirk said, they are permanent, and we cannot change them no more than we can change human nature itself. When we ignore them, or worse, accept their opposite as a fact of life, we take a chisel to the foundation of society and chip away a bit of something very important. That's why it's extremely disheartening to read that most Republicans suddenly don't care if our president cheated on his wife. And to add insult to injury, it appears that Democrats have taken the high-ground on the matter.…