My inspiration for volumn two of “The Life of Julia”

I’m busy writing the first draft of volume two in the “Life of Julia” series, which will be titled “Into the Closet.”

The story will catch up with Julia when she is 17-years old — the second year of her life highlighted in the campaign ad. The ad showed Julia doing very well in public school, which will also be the case in the book. However, I will tackle the issue of religious liberty and the growing trend of the government trampling upon traditional views in the name of mandating universal diversity — which is kind of an oxy-moron. 
Where am I drawing my inspiration? I don’t want to give away too much of the plot while it is still being written, but it is safe to say that the theme was inspired by the case of Owen and Eunice Johns of the United Kingdom. The couple, both Pentecostal Christians, had fostered children for years in Derby, England…until a social worker came by for a routine interview and asked about their views of homosexuality. They said, as Bible-believing Christians (in their words), that it is a sin. The social worker asked what they would tell any of their foster children about homosexuality if they were asked. Owen and Eunice said they would say their faith teaches them that homosexuality is wrong, but that if the child was homosexual, they would love and care for the child and treat them no differently than anyone else – also as their faith teaches. 
They thought wrong. Their license to continue fostering was denied, and the case went all the way to a high court in England who refused to act. The court did, however, issue an amazing opinion revealing the degree to which the U.K. has trampled on religious freedom in the name of “valuing diversity.” British citizens can believe whatever they want — inside their own head and heart — but the court believes they cannot express or practice it in any form that doesn’t comply with the government views.
The opinion, and the arguments backing it up, was straight out of a dystopian novel. I read it, and watched a few interviews about the case, and the idea for the next installment of Julia began to form in my mind. This may have happened in the U.K., but it is already happening to some degree here, and it will only get worse. I recently watched a video from a meeting of the Boston Bar Association where a state employee says they’re “weeding out” potential caregivers who share the views of Owen and Eunice Johns. Passive acceptance of homosexuality isn’t enough, the speakers at the meeting warned, a full endorsement is required. 
I am trying to keep the second story short, perhaps the size of a novella (about 100 pages), and want to published it sometime later this summer. 
Meanwhile, take a look at this clip from a BBC interview show where the issue was discussed.
BBC’s “Question Time” program debates the Derby Foster Care Case

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