Tag: Doug Jones

Sorry AL.com, there’s no ‘burning’ progressive movement in Alabama just because we rejected Roy Moore

It’s now been a week since the election of Doug Jones prompted Al.com’s editorial board to breathlessly declare that the “voice of justice” had spoken for a “burning movement” of “black voters, LGBT activists, women and young voters” who represent the future of our state. Their words crackled with confidence and jubilation because, in their minds, the progressive agenda had finally penetrated the Heart of Dixie. “Doug Jones's election is a moment of change, not only in Alabama, but for an America yearning for signs that these values matter in 2017,” the editorial board gushed. We get it. They were excited. But now that the euphoria has abated, it’s time for them to get back to reality and face the facts: Alabama was, is and will always be one of the most conservative states in the country. Look around. Has anything changed since Jones was elected? Are you seeing more rainbow flags flying in our communities? Did your neighbor trade-in his F-150 for a Prius? Have you suddenly started agreeing with John Archibald and Kyle Whitmire? No. No. And heck no. Only someone stuck in an echo chamber of liberalism would think Alabama embraced even a shred of the Democratic Party’s agenda simply because a majority of our voters rejected someone who many believe molested a 14-year old girl. Alabama didn’t elect Doug Jones. We un-elected the nominee of the Republican Party of Alabama. Big difference. Alabama is still an overwhelmingly conservative state, ranked fifth most conservative by Gallup earlier this…

Who really embarrasses Alabama: Roy Moore’s surrogate or smooth talking Doug Jones?

[caption id="attachment_54107" align="aligncenter" width="800"] (Screenshot/YouTube)[/caption]   By now many Alabamians have watched the campaign clip that had the rest of the country laughing at us for days: former Shelby County commissioner Ted Crockett’s interview last week with CNN’s Jake Tapper. Speaking on Moore’s behalf, Crockett said the judge “probably” believes homosexuality should be illegal and that Americans who aren’t Christian cannot serve in Congress because “you have to swear on a Bible to be an elected official in the United States of America.” In case you missed it, watch it here: https://youtu.be/WFYRkzznsc0 You probably cringed. You may have laughed. And you certainly said, “THIS is why people think Alabama is backward.” I did, too. But while watching Crockett’s clip again over the weekend I had another thought: Sure, this guy has a couple of things wrong but he isn’t what’s wrong with our country. He’s not the problem. He’s not what we’re fighting against. He’s not working to uproot our Founding and fundamentally change our culture. You know who is? Senator-elect Doug Jones. Think about it, who’s really more of an embarrassment to Alabama? -- A) The guy who doesn’t know that someone doesn't actually have to swear on a Bible to hold public office, or -- B) The guy who doesn’t understand it’s wrong to shoot poison into the heart of a seven-month-old unborn child, rip its little arms and legs from its body, and then toss its bloody and broken corpse into the garbage? In case you missed…

How this conservative Alabamian voted this morning

    I didn’t vote for Roy Moore because I believe at least some of those allegations are credible. I didn’t vote for Doug Jones, either, because he supports what any just man would call infanticide. And no, I didn’t waste it on a write-in candidate. I did what I’ve done in every general election since I was 20-years old – I voted to advance the conservative movement by darkening the circle beside the Alabama Republican Party and voting a straight ticket. My vote indeed went into Moore’s column, although indirectly, but he’s not what caused me to stand in line this cold morning and vote. I voted to maintain the GOP’s majority in the U.S. Senate. I voted to confirm judges and justices who’ll uphold the constitution. But more than anything else, I voted for life ... for the millions of unborn children who the Democratic Party has sacrificed on the altar of electoral expediency, and the millions more who’ll die because of that party’s callous indifference to the most innocent and vulnerable among us. When I took my ballot and sat down to vote, I wasn’t thinking about the liberal media or Obamacare or tax cuts or foreign policy or immigration ... or even Roy Moore. I was thinking about how this nation treats unborn children, and how Doug Jones supports a law that every month allows thousands of them to be poisoned in their mother’s womb, have their little arms and legs ripped apart, before they are…

Poll results show write-in candidate Lee Busby may be a Moore election spoiler

  The newest Emerson College poll shows Democrat Doug Jones pulling within just three percentage points of Republican Roy Moore in the Senate seat race.  The poll included write-in candidate Lee Busby who received 5 percent of the vote. Moore led the three with 49 percent support and Jones trailed close behind with 46 percent. Busby's name will not appear on the December 12 special election ballot.  Why this matters: Busby may become a Moore spoiler since his supporters in the poll largely identified themselves as Republicans, said Emerson professor Spencer Kimball in a podcast.       The details: -- The survey asked 500 “very likely” voters, “If the special election for Alabama’s U.S. Senate seat were today, for whom would you vote or lean towards voting?” -- The poll has a margin of error of 4.3 percent, so it could be even more of a dead heat than reported. -- A previous Emerson poll, taken before Busby announced his write-in campaign and immediately after allegations broke of Moore's sexual misconduct, showed Moore leading Jones by 10 percentage points (55 percent to 45 percent). -- In that poll, 28 percent of voters said The Washington Post story affected their vote, while 59 percent said it had no effect on their decision. -- A new CBS / YouGov poll has 71 percent of Republican likely voters saying the allegations against Moore are false.   Bottom line: If Busby and Jones supporters turn out come election day, it may make just enough a difference to make…

Oorah! Alabama Marine launches write-in candidacy against Roy Moore and Doug Jones

[caption id="attachment_51639" align="aligncenter" width="900"] Retired Colonel Lee Busby (Southern Living/YouTube)[/caption]   A retired Marine Corps colonel from Tuscaloosa has launched a long shot write-in campaign seeking to outflank Roy Moore and Doug Jones in next month’s special election, reported the Washington Post. “I just don’t believe that either one of them are qualified to be in the U.S. Senate,” said retired Colonel Lee Busby, 60, a veteran of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Why this matters: Busby could mean real trouble for Moore, whose lead has narrowed to single digits in recent days. Though Busby is unlikely to win, his credentials and beliefs may provide a justifiable option for some GOP voters who feel they cannot vote for Moore but who would never vote for a pro-abortion rights candidate like Jones. The details: -- Lee once served as an aide to White House Chief of Staff John F. Kelly when both were on active duty. -- He told the newspaper that he voted for moderate Republican Ohio Gov. John Kasich in the last presidential primary and then Donald Trump in the general. -- Lee told the Post that he attended a fundraiser for Jones earlier this year but didn’t contribute. -- The colonel said he supports lowering taxes, repealing Obamacare and restricting abortion. -- He said that life begins at conception, adding that “at some point, (the fetus) becomes a human life ... and you have to protect those who can’t protect themselves."

J. Pepper Bryars: Roy Moore would lose by 20-points if his Democratic opponent were pro-life (or at least not so pro-abortion)

[caption id="attachment_49761" align="aligncenter" width="800"] (MSNBC/YouTube)[/caption]     Doug Jones would likely swamp Roy Moore in next month’s special election if the Democrat didn’t hold such extreme pro-abortion views. Consider this: -- Nearly 60 percent of adults in Alabama believe that abortion should be illegal in all or most cases, according to a survey by the Pew Research Center. They found that only 37 percent felt the opposite. -- Alabama now has more than 3.3 million registered voters, according to our secretary of state’s office. Why this matters: Do the math. By adopting such an extreme view on abortion rights (the “legal in all or most cases” belief), Jones traded a potential block of 1.9-million pro-life votes for a measly 1.2-million pro-choice votes. Democrats are leaving 700,000 voters on the table – voters who are very pro-life. How pro-life? Here are just a couple of emails that I’ve received from Yellowhammer readers on the issue: -- “I will NEVER vote for anyone who supports abortion on demand,” wrote Garry Lovette of Muscle Shoals. -- “I can’t find myself voting for Doug Jones with his deplorable view on abortion,” added Dr. Andrew Hodges of Scottsboro. And here’s my two-cents just to make Yellowhammer’s editorial position crystal clear: I will never, even under pain of death, vote for someone who thinks abortion-on-demand should remain legal. Never. Sure, some extreme pro-choice voters would likely abandon any pro-life Democrat nominee, but the difference is wide enough – 700,000 voters – that such a candidate could easily gain much…

Hell or High Water: Roy Moore won’t withdraw so Republicans across Alabama are seeking options

[caption id="attachment_49871" align="aligncenter" width="800"] (ABC News/YouTube)[/caption]   If we know one thing about Judge Roy Moore it’s this: he’s not going to willingly step aside and allow the political establishment to place someone else’s name on the ballot. https://twitter.com/MooreSenate/status/928771064406167552   If he goes, it’ll be the same way Moore was removed from the bench – by force of law. That’s why Republican insiders across Alabama were up late into the night Thursday trading emails, texts and telephone calls asking each other the same question: How can the party legally replace Roy Moore on the ballot? Here are some of the options, however remote, that we learned about overnight: -- It’s too late: A spokesman for the Alabama secretary of state said “it was too late” to replace any name appearing on the December 12 ballot. Here’s the law: “Any amendment filed after the 76th day before a primary or a general election shall be accepted by the judge of probate or the Secretary of State but shall not be cause for reprinting of the ballots,” according to the statute. “The name of a candidate who is the subject of the amendment and who is disqualified by a political party or who has withdrawn as a candidate shall remain on the ballot, not be replaced by the name of another candidate, and the appropriate canvassing board shall not certify any votes for the candidate.” -- It’s not too late: Some say that the state Republican executive committee has the power to…

Alabama’s Democrat nominee for the U.S. Senate would be a certain “No” vote for pro-life Supreme Court justices

[caption id="attachment_49761" align="aligncenter" width="800"] (MSNBC/YouTube)[/caption]   Alabama’s special election for U.S. Senate next month is about one thing: the Supreme Court. Regardless of either candidate’s campaign promises, the arcane rules of senate seniority mean that the winner will be a powerless backbencher for at least the next couple of years, maybe more, unable to change much and capable of very little. The one vote that matters: The senate is nearly split down the middle, so whoever wins – Democrat Doug Jones or Republican Roy Moore – will likely cast one of the two or three deciding votes on who’ll replace pro-abortion Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg or crucial swing-vote Justice Anthony Kennedy. We know how Moore will vote. He’s 100-percent prolife. But what about Jones? The Democrat Party’s nominee recently said he’s “not in favor of anything that is going to infringe on a woman’s right and her freedom to choose” to abort her unborn child, even when the baby can feel pain after 20-weeks, even when the baby could survive outside of the womb weeks later. https://youtu.be/6N319bNkuWo?t=5m46s That shocking statement leaves very little room for interpretation or divination: He is “not in favor of anything” that would slow or stop abortion in this country, and that would include reversing Roe v. Wade. Jones would be a certain “no” vote against a pro-life nominee to the high court, and would likely cast even more “no” votes on the dozens of lower court pro-life nominees that could come before the chamber during…

Democrat senate candidate’s abortion views are abhorrent to most Alabamans

[caption id="attachment_49123" align="aligncenter" width="800"] Photo from DougJonesForSenate.com[/caption]   Doug Jones, the Democrat nominee to replace Senator Jeff Sessions, appeared on MSNBC recently and was asked whether he’d support banning abortion after 20-weeks, the time at which an unborn child is known to feel the pain of the brutal procedure. “You wouldn’t be in favor of legislation that said ban abortion after 20 weeks, or something like that?” asked Chuck Todd, the show’s host. “No, I’m not in favor of anything that is going to infringe on a woman’s right and her freedom to choose,” Jones said. “That’s just the position that I’ve had for many years, it’s the position I continue to have.” Not ... in ... favor ... of ... anything. Jones then attempted to mask the atrocious opinion by saying that, “once a baby is born, I’m going to be there for that child, that’s where I become a right-to-lifer.” Seriously? So we’re to think that in the few months, few weeks, or perhaps even few days or hours before birth, the baby is something else, perhaps the often described “blob of tissue.” But then something magical happens that turns the baby into a person between the moment it’s in the mother’s womb and the moment it's in the doctor’s hands. Move over, Fairy Godmother. Your old trick of turning pumpkins into carriages is child’s play compared to this. And that’s where Doug Jones and his party are on this issue – a land of fiction. Anyone with…

Three Lessons Republicans Must Learn From That Messy Alabama Primary

Some say Judge Roy Moore’s victory over Senator Luther Strange last Tuesday was a loss for the president: “Alabama defeat leaves Trump weakened, isolated amid mounting challenges,” read a headline in the Washington Post. Others say it was a defeat for the Senate majority leader: “Judge Roy Moore wins Alabama Senate primary, dealing a huge blow to Mitch McConnell,” declared the liberal news site Vox. And a few even say it was all about the chairman of Breitbart News: “Steve Bannon just defeated Trump,” wrote liberal columnist E.J. Dionne Jr. But this wasn’t about Trump or McConnell or Bannon, and it wasn’t even really about Moore or Strange. It was about Alabama. More precisely, it was about how Republicans in Alabama choose candidates to stand against Democrats in the general election, and then against liberalism once in office. But if we allow a proxy war between Trump and McConnell and Bannon and whoever else to distract us, then we’ll fail to learn some valuable lessons that tumbled out of this messy but instructive race. It’d be foolish to repeat these mistakes in another Republican primary, but it could be catastrophic to do so during a general election. So let’s remind ourselves of three big ones: Lesson 1: Never disrespect the voters. Like many Republicans in Alabama, I had a somewhat open mind at the beginning of the primary. And there was plenty to like. If you like former Senator Jeff Sessions, then you’d probably love Congressman Mo Brooks. He’d carry…